DRAGA - PRIMOŠTEN

DRAGA - PRIMOŠTEN

The Hilic peninsula, located between Grebaštica and the Bay of Marina, is an ancient area where people lived since the Prehistoric period until present time. In the Middle Ages it was called Bosiljna and nowadays Suha punta. This is evidenced by the hoard of Krčulj from the early Iron age (800BC), the tumuli on the hill of Jagleš and near the pond of Bojana, and by the recently discovered roof tile with the Pansiana stamp seal in Prhovo, dating from the 1st century. The church of St. George, the oldest church and the oldest parish is lasko located in Prhovo. Next to it there is a cemetery with stećci - monumental medieval tombstones. Croats moved here in the 8th century BC and, after converting to Catholicism, stayed here until today. People cannot live without water, and here they found it in the vast pond of Bojana, located not far away from the settlements of Bosiljna and Prhovo, and 400m from Draga, the central village of Primošten Burnji. Primošten Burnji consists of 12 hamlets, all closely connected to Bojana, which is why they settled here in the first place. The name of Bojana comes from the word boj which means battle; in order to gain possession of Bojana, one had to go to battle, to war. The master of Bojana was the master of the entire Hilic peninsula, i.e. Bosiljna. Bojana could water up to 6000 heads of cattle through three dry summer months without even a drop of rain. The inhabitants of Kruševo, Široko, Krčulj and Prhovo fled from the Turks to the nearby islands, mostly to the island of Caput Cista, where they founded a new settlement, Primošten, in the 15th century. Primošten is situated 30km from Šibenik and Trogir. The entire hilly area of Primošten stretches over 100 square kilometers with over 30 hamlets, with the altitude ranging between 1 and 250 meters, with Mediterranean climate ( hot and dry summers and mild, but rainy winters) and Adriatic flora and fauna. The inhabitants mostly cultivated grape vine, figs, sour cherries and olives in this craggy landscape; from grains they grew barley and from legumes beans and lentil. The deserted area of Bosiljna was again populated by the Bosnian refugees from Bosnia who fled from theTurks. The ancestors of Jurlin’s family (Jure Pitešić – Perkov) came here in the 18th century, in the last wave of refugees. He first lived in Krčulj ( Gnjojinac), then in Marinčić’s Draga ( Primošten Burnji) on the property of Marinčić, a merchant from Šibenik; 5km away from the sea. Today there are 43 people living in18 families in Draga and at the Estate of Jurlinovi dvori there is only one
– father Stipe Perkov.

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http://www.jurlinovidvori.org/index.php/en/draga#sigProId16e15e6bb4